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coalition now? >> ok, so when you poll the public on things like education, jobs -- people want good jobs. people want the american dream. if you look at doug sosnik's recent blog post, which i think was not in "atlantic" but in "politico"? sorry. i think it is totally right that one of the great unifying factors in this country was if you work hard, and play by a set of fairness rules, you should do ok. and our guidepost was -- are our kids, the next generation, are they doing better than we are? that has changed. and people are really anxious about that. they want to work hard and they want to do ok. so i think there is -- when i looked at the elections, in 2013, chris christie won in new jersey, that is true, but so did minimum wage expansion. terry mcauliffe won in virginia, walsh in boston, deblasio in new york. toledo, the person who was pro- public education -- >> could you speak up? >> sorry. the person who was pro-education won. so there is something going on in the country that is about, yes, working hard. nobody wants a handout. but let's level the playing field so we have grea
i want to now recognize the chairman of the higher education and workforce committee mr. kline for five minutes. >> thank you madam chair into the witnesses for being here. you are quite excellent. how does your idea looking at your testimony would require students to take the azt or the sat and meet the threshold scores based on the gpa. i listened to the testimony and you talk about how you have a greater success rate if they have had a high school education and so forth. i do not understand how this would work for the millions of what we are still calling nontraditional students, people going back to the community college or for-profit school or something like that to get a particular skill. .. to find an alternative way to achieve standards. for example, after one semester of satisfactory academic proprogress in a community college they become reeligible even if not under rigorous high school standards. >> so if they had the low s.a.t., act they have to go the first semester not qualifying for a pell grant. but if they demonstrated then academic capability they would be? >>
millions of other families that, what's wrong with mom? it was not the education about alcoholism and drug dependency that there is now. it took dad -- dad searched through several doctors before finding a doctor that had the courage to say your wife's an alcoholic. that was not just the image anybody accepted. found the right doctor, dad -- excuse me -- had the courage to say we're going to do this intervention, the whole family went in, did the intervention with mom, and, you know, at that time, i never heard the word "intervention," and now you got tv shows that do it. it was a different time. we did it. dad led the intervention, and my memory of that is very clear. he walked in the door that morning, all the kids, dad, surprised mom, took her hand and said, betty, we're here because we love you, the kids want their mother back, i want my wife back, and those interventions are tough. i mean, that is tough, hard, hard, hard work. a lot of tears. a lot of crying. a lot of raised voices. a lot of hugs, more raised voices, denial, and not denial, and i mean, it goes back and forth. it's a t
rankings were based on e tests of more than half a million 15-year-olds. the u.s. education secretary arnie duncan calling it stagnation. but before we talk about how to fix the problem, let's look deeper. there might be a lot less here than meets the eye. they're broken down in connecticut, florida, and massachusetts. in connecticut and massachusetts, two of the richest states in the union were students generally perform better than the worldwide average. the policy substitute said that america lags in social testing. if you were to correct for their massive income inequality, the performance is better than it appears. consider that the top issuer in all three categories was shanghai, a result that gave rise to headlines proclaiming china has having the smartest students. they are just 1.7% of china's population. country, essentially forces many of the children of poor workers to leave shanghai for high school. while testing was done three years ago in china's rural areas, the chinese government only allowed the release of shanghai's scores. it underlies almost every conversation we have a
and republicans that education is the solution to the problem. if we just figure out better to educate our poor kids we could reduce the inequality. and the president today acknowledged that may not be enough. >> the outcomes we're having today, the health care, the budget, reforming our financial systems, all of these things will have a practical effect on americans, i am convinced the decisions we make in the next few years, will determine whether or not america will be the country where children can grow up and have opportunities that are real. >> i have seen you talk about your work in education as fundamentally driven towards precisely the kinds of goals the president talks about today. reducing inequality. expanding social mobility. and i wonder what your take is on how much of that can be achieved through education, while we have seen outside the schools such a massively expanding amount of poor people. >> yeah, i think part of the problem that we have in the debate today is that people think that you either have to solve the problem of poverty through social programs or it is all about
's education program most sheltered place transportation and logistics hub. what part of the current plans as a transit country between moscow and brussels what book it makes me pee what security in the middle east. what how iraq in the contact group agreed upon you. the couple city's development. how will cost an arm looked like in the future what did you know which end to the family tree and read about it. let cool discuss the major events of the off week the little known figure and in the middle. just need today to help analyze the most important local and international news development. the full compels the to do. this fossil is the date of the first temple december thirst bit about some of the institute of the president of the stump was cited with the collapse of the soviet union. in december of nineteen ninety one as the wall which in amazement. the soviet union disintegrated in the fifteen separate countries. on the twenty four nineteen ninety a year before the solution if obama by four appointed as a present of kazakhstan. to the mall of all the events of that unit mr was telling
home offer access to everything from education, to health care, to a safe shelter from the streets, which means that you're harnessing the power of community to expand opportunity for folks here in d.c. and your work reflects a tradition that runs through our history -- a belief that we're greater together than we are on our own. and that's what i've come here to talk about today. over the last two months, washington has been dominated by some pretty contentious debates i think that's fair to say. and between a reckless shutdown by congressional republicans in an effort to repeal the affordable care act, and admittedly poor execution on my administration's part in implementing the latest stage of the new law, nobody has acquitted themselves very well these past few months. so it's not surprising that the american people's frustrations with washington are at an all- time high. but we know that people's frustrations run deeper than these most recent political battles. their frustration is rooted in their own daily battles -- to make ends meet, to pay for college, buy a home, save for
.d on my facebook i hear you support common core education standards, i'll never support you again. or you need to learn the truth about common core. i guess the person that said he would never watch my show again is never going to hear this and that's too bad. i want to cut right to the chase. i don't support what common core has become in many states and school districts. i'm dead set against the government setting a uniform curriculum for any subject. i do not like to identify students, track them, and give that personal information to the federal government. i'm steadfast in my belief that parents should ultimately decide the best for their children's education. whether it is public, private, religious, or home schools. it has come to thinks that i detest like an agenda driving curriculum. i'm convinced that the term common core needs to disappear from education policy. it's a toxic term because it's come to mean things that most of us can't stomach like stop down federal intrusions. but that had nothing to do with the federal government. it was conceived and controlled by elected gove
powerful military, but the best education system? not so much. the survey compares thousands of reports from around the world. u.s. students are average in reading and science, below average in math. the u.s. came in 36 out of 65 developed countries between the slovak republican and lithuania. students in shanghai are more than two years ahead of the peers in massachusetts. the u.s. did better in reading, 24th in the world rankings. number one, shanghai again. science, the u.s. came in number 28 on that list. the top performer? you guessed it. shanghai, china. the u.s. will not get the most improved award. the u.s. fell in all three subjects from 2009 to 2012. u.s. education secretary arne duncan says it points a picture of education stagnation. is the u.s. falling behind or is everyone else getting better? i sat down with candy crowley and christiane amanpour and asked why the u.s. is falling behind. >> what is the problem with education? we keep throwing money at it. the interesting statistics are that the u.s. spends a huge amount of money on education, it doesn't spend as much as ot
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. they had been offering a manufacturing education program for 12 years and had 98% to 100% placement rate. we have 12 community colleges. it makes no sense in a state that is number two per capita in submarines and construction. almost all of it is high-value added as opposed to lower value added. we were not reshaping our schools to produce the human capital. >> did you find out why not? >> yes, it was outside the box. it was outside people's educational box. we now have added three additional community colleges. that model is being used to rebuild the high schools, which the state runs. yes, we are changing. >> thank you, i really appreciate it. i want to thank you for all the school safety measures. rick alluded to secretary duncan's piece. has the federal government become irrelevant to the work you are doing, or is there a role the federal government can play that complements your role? -- complements the role the state and local government can play? >> let's go back to the comments about the $100 million grant program. even if you don't get one of those grants, it is a learning expe
years is a direct result of economic insecurity now. it has led, for spm, to education cuts that have harmed children in low-income school districts. reversing those decisions can still have an enormous impact." but under president obama, america's spending more money on education than any other nation in the world. also, taxes have been going up. and we have record debt. but the left wants more spending and even higher taxes. simply put, the big government spending machine has not helped the economy very much. but again, liberal theory trumps results. >> the idea that so many children are born into poverty in the wealthiest nation on earth is heartbreaking enough, but the idea that a child may never be able to escape that poverty because she lacks a decent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own? that should offend all of us. >> well, it certainly offends me. if children are not getting a good education or do not have proper health care, i'm offended. but you cannot bankrupt the entire nation on some ideological quest for income equality. in a capit
'll sort the truth from the spin. >>> plus, new global education rankings once again show american students lagging. so just how worried should we be? and china flexes its military muscle as vice president joe biden visits the region. will the u.s. stand firm with japan as tensions rise? >> obviously the website, when it was first launched, wasn't in tip-top shape, to say the least. but we have been 24/7 going at it and now for the vast majority of users it's working. so i'm going to need you all to share the word about how the affordable care act really works, what its benefits are, what its protections are and, most importantly, how people can sign up. >> welcome to "the journal editorial report." that was president obama at the white house youth summit pitching the revamped whitehouse.gov website. they are touting this week's rising enrollment numbers and to sell it to a still skeptical public. is obama care on the road to recovery? let's ask joe rag go, deputy editor dan and kim. so joe, has obama care turned the corner here, as the white house says. >> they'd love to make you think tha
in the evolution of education? our camps and programs like it the wave of the future? >> it is part of the future. the biggest key as that this country has a fascination with higher education, which is great. at the same time, we seem to be hypnotized with the idea or the myth that college and higher education are the same thing. i think we should scale back that idea. college is part of higher education. but there are other things we can do to get people educated and into the workplace that doesn't depend on a four year degree. i think part of this is a mental shift, shifting away from college being the solution to that being part of the solution of a much wider range of educational opportunities that people have. we are not trained to recognize those. >> do you think this country is doing a disservice to potential employees and potential members of the workforce i not making that distinction between college and higher education? >> absolutely. i don't think it is poorly intentioned. i think it has been decades that we got of college of higher education. but if you look at germany, where the une
and being responsive and looking at workers compensation reform or hiving -- or having a highly educated labor sector. drive an things help economy. people in the past said, well, we really don't have enough fossil fuel supply. but now we know, through technology and innovation, having the good and fair regulations, that we do have energy supply. so my state of oklahoma, since 2011 when i took office because of our business-friendly policies, education, reform we have done, making government smaller and more efficient, we have seen our economy change. the per capita income has grown by 8% for a family of four. >> it is self-defense. you have a guy who will steal every last job from you if they can. rick perry -- he is glad they are up here right now. while we are up here talking, he had his people on the phone to ohio and oklahoma stealing their jobs. >> we fish where the fish are. and generally speaking, i am spending a lot more time in california or illinois and new york than i am in oklahoma. >> we just beat him in football. [laughter] >> you know how to hurt a person, mary. >> but li
that poverty because she lumberjacks a decent education or a health care or a community that views her future as their own it should offend all of us. the combined trends of declining mobility it poses a threat to our way of life. what drives me as a zbroond, a son, a father, as an american is to make sure that every striving hard-working optimistic kid in america has the same incredible chance that this country gave me. >> the current minimum wage is $7.25, adjusted for inflation. that's more than $3 less than the minimum wage was back in 1968. president obama said he'll support a senate bill to increase the minimum wage to $10.10 but not going to be easy. >> what would the prospects of that be not only in the senate but the house? >> they are not good. it would be easier to do that than to increase taxes on the wealthy at this point in time because that's been ruled off the table by congressional republicans. if you're going after inequality with those brunt instrument, minimum wage would be easier to do. income in equality, the historical trends are staggering. with respect to fast food wo
there. he'll be talking about education policy. [inaudible conversations] >> hey, good afternoon, everyone. we're going to go ahead and get started. hey, how you doing this afternoon? i'm rick hess, director of education policy studies here at the american enterprise institute. happy to welcome all of you to join us today for this promising and, i think, intriguing conversation with connecticut governor dan malloy. delighted to have those of you who are here with us and also those of you watching at home either via live stream or on c-span2. the hashtag for the event is hashtag ct ed reform, that's capital ct ed reform. feel free to follow along or join in. we are going to be going for an hour, until 2:30. format's going to be pretty straightforward. first, governor malloy, dan malloy of connecticut, has been kind enough to agree to share some thoughts on the dos and don'ts of school reform in connecticut, what are some of the lessons they've learned as they have tackled this work. i'm going to then have an opportunity to chat with the governor for 15 or 20 minutes, ask him a cou
much. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> >> woodruff: next, how the american education system stacks up in global rankings and the questions surrounding that assessment. jeffrey brown has the story. >> brown: it's considered by many the world's most important exam. the program for international student assessment, or "pisa" test, has been given to 15-year- olds in 65 countries every three years since 2000. a way to test and compare performances in reading, math and science. results from 2012 were released today, and, once again, the u.s. hovered near the middle of the pack, lagging in some areas even as other countries advanced. math remains the biggest challenge. 29 other systems had higher average scores than american high schoolers. the u.s. fared better in reading, where it ranked 20th, and in science, ranking 23rd. the best results were in east asia, where students from shanghai, singapore, south korea and japan, among others, placed near the top. pisa results also showed another concern for american teens as well: a smaller percentage of them reached the top levels of proficiency.
education to health care to a safe shelter from the streets, which means that you're harnessing the power of community to expand opportunity for folks here in d.c. and your work reflects a tradition that runs through our history. the belief that we're greater together than we are on our own. and that's what i've come here to talk about today. now, over the last two months, washington has been dominated by some pretty contentious debates. i think that's fair to say. and between a reckless shutdown by congressional republicans in an effort to repeal the affordable care act and admittedly poor execution on my administration's part in implementing the latest stage of the new law, nobody has acquitted themselves very well these past few months, so it's not surprising that the american people's frustrations with washington are at an all-time high. but we know that people's frustrations run deeper than these most recent political battles. their frustrations rooted in their own daily battles, to make ends meet, to pay for college, buy a home, save for retirement. it's rooted in the nagging sense
a few things that were on our list that we just had to get done. the tax code had to work, education had to work. you had to have regulatory system that worked. you had to be fast on the dime in working with the private sector because they could take their investment and go elsewhere real fast. so we had our own little strategy. and i would guess that you sitting down, what is the strategy for hawaii? what is it that you must get ght to survive in the 21st century? and that then define what is you need to do even if you find yourself in the minority position. >> did i hear you correctly are you the only republican in the tate senate? >> i'm actually in the house. but there is one senator out of 25 in the senate and there are 7 out of 51 in the house. so we are eight out of 76. >> we're trying to change your dynamic. >> well, the united states capitol there's a saying in the house that the other political party is the opposition. but the enemy, the enemy is the senate. so i guess we temporarily lumped you in with the enemy. so we're sorry about that. it sounds like your side emphasizes qu
, julie has done on affordable care act. a lot to talk about today including some disturbing education all rankings coming out. >> we'll get to that. we'll begin with the train derailment in new york. federal investigators are turning their attention to the engineer as new revelations of just how fast the train was going. the train was going 82 miles per hour when it took that curve. it should have been traveling at just 30 miles per hour. nbc's tom costello has the latest on the investigation. >> reporter: on the tracks in the bronx mta crews lifted the remains of the broken train as crash investigators went in for a closer look. tons of twisted steel scraped and crushed from sunday's violent crash. the ntsb announced the two black boxes recovered from the train revealed a stunning development. >> train was traveling at approximately 82 miles per hour as it went into a 30 mile-per-hour curve. >> reporter: 82 miles per hour. only six seconds before the train came to a complete second engine power was cutback. then the engineer suddenly applied full brakes. >> when i heard about the speed,
they were laid bear for the whole world to see. >> i want to ask both of you about education initiative, the studies out today, every three years global testing of teenagers, 15 years old. what we found, for all the money spent by bush administration and before this the obama administration, race to the top, all of the advancements we've been expecting, that american students have moved downward in these testings. we now rank below what we rank before. we're mid-range. actually rank below vietnam on math and reading scores. vietnam, which is not considered like shanghai and singapore, some other leading asian countries has now moved up. ron, you've studied a lot of this. you've covered all of these issues. what's going on here with our inability to make any headway on what is arguably a national security issue, the fact our kids are falling behind on math and science. >> you're exactly right. it is a national security issue. i would step back and put the education system in that big bucket of national institutions that are failing to adapt to the times. just like our other institutions
. they will pour resources into helping to improve the education of every child growing up in their native land. mandela greatly valued education. he once said education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. >> education was just very, very important to my grandfather. education is one of his things that he's so passionate about. every single one our family was educated. because he said when you're educated nobody else can take it away from you. >> for their support, for their love, for their dedication towards my father and the family. to thank them for their prayers and comfort during this difficult time. >> our thanks to the mandela family for sharing their father with the world. in the words of else in mandela, for to be free is not nearly to cast off ones chains but to live in a way that enhances the freedom of others. his daughter says he achieved that through the practice of peace and reconciliation. >> thank you, kelly. there are some new concerns over so-called energy drinks. accord to a brand-new study, those beverages can pose a serious risk to your heart
have been older workers, workers of color and workers with less education. and that's not particularly surprising because these are the workers who, even in a robust economy, experience the greatest difficult in getting jobs in the first place for a variety of reasons including discrimination. the very fact of long-term unemployment is affecting these workers' ability to get new jobs. i know many of you are co-sponsors on legislation that would prohibit discrimination against the long-term unemployed which is certainly a measure we would also encourage you to take up as soon as you can. but today's focus is obviously on extending the benefits. finally, i want to stress again the importance of renewing the program, not just because of the workers who will be affected, and you will hear from them, but for the economy overall, for the labor market overall and for our society overall. as congressman levin again pointed out this morning, we know that unemployment insurance is one of the most effective economic stimuli that we have. cbo said if the program is renewed, it could account for as
that poverty because she lacks a decent education or health care, or a community that views her future as their own? that should offend all of us. and it should compel us to acts. we are a better country -- to action. we are a better country than this. so let me repeat: the combined trends of increased inequality and decreasing mobility pose a fundamental threat to the american dream, our way of life and what we stand for around the globe. >> president went on to say that a so-called deficit of opportunity, interesting phrasing there, is much more important than the fiscal deficit, the yearly fiscal deficit in this country which he points out is actually shrchging in his administration john. >> point out, this issue about the young people are disappointed with president and congress. >> part of the obama coalition that got him elected twice is young people, so-called millennials. folks at harvard has a unit that polled these folks. 18 to 25, bad news for the president, festival his approval rating down to 41%. that is a reflection of the population at large but down 11% since just thi
online already. martha: disappointing news about america's education system. according to the latest survey when it comes to major subjects like math, reading and signs, u.s. teenagers fall ray behind their counter parts in asia and europe. gregg palkot is live in london to tell us more about these results. >> reporter: the international report card for schools is out. it comes from the well-regarded oedd. while we don't get an f it feels like a c. our teenagers are 20th in the world in reading skills and a as for math, 28 other countries are ahead of our teenagers. here is what they have to say about our results. >> at the end of the day quality of outcome and quality of education can never exceed the quality of instruction. >> reporter: we have had a statement from the education secretary. he calls it a picture of stagnation. while things have not gotten worse. our rankings have split because others have gotten better'. chinese cities like beijing and hong kong lead the way. in a heating unglobal economy strong numbers. martha: we are spending more money, we have more technology be
because she lacks a decent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own. that should offend all of us. and it should compel us to action. we are a better country than this. >> i mean, when we get to the point where children in no fault of their own are living in these situations and it's just discarded, that's troubling about the spirit of the country and those that are in government, congressman. >> well, a nation that wants to consider itself respectful and decent ought to want to have its citizens live a respectful and decent life. and to do so you've got to pay people a decent wage. we've got to raise the wage from $7.25 to $9. just think about this. in 1938 fdr was successful in getting the minimum wage raised. and from 1938 to 2013 it's raised only $7. they are having difficulty surviving. this nation is not a mean spirited nation. and the majority of the people, i think, go along with what we're saying. the problem is it will never be brought up to a vote here in the house of representatives. >> when the congressman says this is not a mean spirited
was a professor of american history in the cave from ohio and educated at ohio state. and graduated 1910 with a couple of sisters and my great-grandfather was german immigrants a and ohio state's 1926 even back then to be overwhelmed of the corporation's. and also one more thing, my father was part of that cycle of american history of the conservative serious locally every 30 years so he picked up the historical academic structures from my grandpa. >> they're all from the midwest so there was the therapy they brought to the east. debt was genetic civic given the current political climate but in the postwar years a strong conservative current of mccarthy of ohio. because they were witness there was the entirely different climate it did 15 seconds i will give a very remote part of south dakota that build a hydroelectric dam in the middle of nowhere at a store their expensive paid very good wages and change the lives of everybody who went through their. now coming back as doctors and engineers. of those courageous with the importance to get out and touch and feel what of those accounts that
then public, on things like education, jobs, people want good jobs. people want the american dream. if you look at the muscles in the -- if you look at doug post,ck's recent blog which i think was not in "atlantic" but it "politico"? sorry. thatnk it is totally right one of the great unifying factors in this country was if by a sethard, and play of fairness rules, you should do ok. kids,r guidepost for our the next generation, are they doing better than they are. that has changed. and people are really anxious about that. they want to work hard and they want to do ok. so i think there is -- when i looked at the elections, in new, chris christie won in jersey, that is true, but so did minimum wage expansion. virginia,liffe won in walsh in boston, palacios in new york. the person who was protested education -- >> could you speak up? >> the person who was pro- education won. so there is something going on in the country that is about, yes, working hard. nobody wants a handout. but let's level the playing field so we have great public education and we have ways for people to enter or reenter o
job today without some higher education, so we've helped more students go to college with grants and loans that go farther than before. we've made it more practical to repay those loans and today more students are graduating from college than ever before. we're also pursuing an aggressive strategy to promote innovation that reins in tuition cost. we have a lower cost so young people are not burdened by enormous debt when they make the right decision to get higher education. and next week, michelle and i will bring together college presidents and non-profits to lead a campaign to help more low-income students attend and succeed in college. but -- [ applause ] while higher education may be the surest path to the middle class, it's not the only one. so we should offer our people the best technical education in the world. that's why we've worked to connect local businesses with community colleges so workers, young and old, can earn the new skills that earn them more money. and i've also embraced an idea that i know all of you at the center for american progress have championed. and b
. the education system is riddled with problems. and you also see that there is an increasing public corruption. so the current president has been involved in a huge scandal involving his private home. so people look to nelson mandela and think theres with a leader. there was someone with real integrity. so i think that this is a moment for people to look back and reflect on where they've come from and how to get back on the right path. >> woodruff: and also by definition losing what i think you call the moral center for the country. >> well, i think for many people nelson pan della does represent a kind of moral center. and a choice to turn away from violence, to turn away from strife. and to turn away from racial divisions. and instead of standing in judgement of one another, to reconcile and to admit that we did terrible things to each other. but now we're ready to move on. and i think that was the great gift of nelson mandela. that he was able to bring people together in a way that made them feel that they could forgive and made them move on. >> woodruff: lydia, one other thing. you wrote t
the variety of views we had for instance when the heritage foundation -- heritage was about education reform and getting a lot of different conservatives together. they would fight like heck about the best way forward on education reform, the best way forward on tax reform. jack kempe would have horrible fights with phil gramm and others and then they would come together and come up with a tax reform plan. there were to be constant battles on the budget. there were a lot of different ways forward in the conservatives we believe even into the 90s, 1994 we always talked about a legislative laboratory of ideas and you talked about the place of ideas and we talked about the free marketplace of ideas. we would close the doors and go downstairs and debate nonstop among ourselves until we came up with the best plan for reform moving for it. just not the case anymore. if you veer off the path a little bit to the right or a little bit to the left there are ideological witch hunts and people suggesting you are insufficiently conservative and insufficiently republican. that is the 9% party. that's the
educate. he was the most educated candidate they ever had to try to move voters to a new place. >> you mentioned the learning. and gay mcdougall, you campaigned to release him from prison. he used the time in prison to be educated as well. >> absolutely. he used it to be educated and educated the other prisoners. he called it the university of robben island. they spent time learning about political development around the world. they decided who they, as a political party and as, you know, activists, wanted to be. the decisionmaking. when they finally emerged, from that prison, they knew exactly the road they wanted to travel. >> and jendayi frazer, he was conscious of his role as educator when he became president and after he left office as well. didn't often hide disappointment in what was going on in south africa and other african nations. >> yes, he certainly was. i think president mandela, what i took from him was the courage of his convictions. he was very clear when he did not agree. he would do that privately and publicly. for instance, on the issue of hiv and aids, he certainly
in the workshop and educators can get lesson plans to use in the classroom. >> you don't use sugar for any of these things, right? sugar has seen a big decrease in the last five weeks. sugar prices have dropped pretty steadily in the last five weeks. there's nothing surprisingly in the 12 days that uses sugar, right? >> if you remember last year, becky, we had the drought in the summertime which drove up food prices and grain prices. >> right. right. >> which caused the bird costs to go up. this year both energy and food prices are down. >> we were going to play a little music or something so the total price is, did you tell us that already, $27,993.17. up 7.7% this year, joe. >> 7.7. inflation. all right, jim. thank you. >> good to see you. happy holidays. >>> folks, it is cyber monday. that's when people return to work and do some shopping online. we're going to talk about ecommerce prospects when "squawk box" comes right back ♪ ♪ the most wonderful time of the year ♪ capital to make it happen? without the thinking that makes it real? what's a vision without the expertise to execut
health care while talking about higher education and ongoing budget battle. >> more people without insurance gained shurngs, 3 million young americans have been able to stay on their parents plan, more than half a million americans and counting poised to get coverage started on january 1st. some for the very first time. it is these numbers, not the ones in any poll, that will ultimately determine the fate of this law. >> meanwhile, a source familiar with the program confirms to nbc news that 29,000 people signed up the newly repaired healthcare.gov sunday and monday, a figure that surpasses the total for the entire month of october. still not clear how many of them were so-called the young invisibles and over on capitol hill, house republicans continue their focus on the implementation of the law with four separate committee hearings on the affordable care act. nbc news without correspondent peter alexander joins us now. interesting to note, the president has said all along the issue of health care is about the economics as much as it is about what he sees as the right for people t
highlighting the fact that a lot of this job growth, good jobs, manufacturing, education, construction. so they say that those are signs that the economy is moving in the right direction. at the same time, as you point out, the white house looking at those numbers and using them to argue that unemployment insurance should be extended for 1.3 million americans. they point out that within those economic figures you can see 4 million americans have been unemployed for six months or more. here's what president obama had to say in his weekly address. take a listen. >> for many families it can be the difference between hardship and catastrophe. it makes a difference for a mother who suddenly doesn't know if she will be able to put food on the table for his kids or a father who lost his job and is looking for a new one. last year it ended 2.5 people out of poverty and cushioned the blow for many more. >> now, alex, republicans are making the opposite argument. they are saying that the low unemployment rate or relatively low unemployment rate speaks to the fact that the economy doesn't need more s
growth is greater than would be without them. where women and girls are given the chance to be educated and to get the healthcare they deserve to have, we know that societies benefit. where women and girls can participate in peace making and peace building as full members of society trying to resolve conflicts, we know that resolution is more likely to be sustained. it's a great honor for me to have this award. but it is a reminder of how much more we have yet ahead of us to accomplish. to make sure that tom's dream, tom's life, the examples of the award recipients with us and those unable to come, bring out in each of us our own commitments to what we will do to further the cause of human rights, universal human rights for every man, woman, boy and girl in the world. it is certainly what tom would expect us to do to hold high his ideals and by accepting this award and knowing that tom would not let me off the hook, otherwise, it is something that i will continue to be committed to in every way that i can with every fiber of my being. because the kind of world we want is a world in whi
to escape poverty, because she lacks a decent education or health care. that should offend all of us. what drives me is a grandson, a son, a father, an american, is to make sure that every striving, hard-working, optimistic kid has the same incredible chance that this country gave me. dr. king once said, of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking. not anymore. if you still don't like obama care, you owe it to the american people to tell us what you are for. not just what you're against. >>> here at 30 rock, we are counting down to tonight's lighting of the famous rockefeller christmas tree. that war on christmas, a lot of hum bug, of course. but as president obama prepares to join in the national tree-lighting on friday, he's got a few other things to attend to. first, including a long list of policy goals that he wants to achieve for the american people. starting, of course, with the affordable care act. the affordable care for all. so just this afternoon, the president kept up his three-week push to promote the affordable care act. this time in a white
, but stronger labor laws, more funding for education and a social safety net. >> but the idea that a child may never be able to escape that poverty because she lacks a decent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own? that should offend all of us. the combined trends of increase and equality and decreasing mobility pose a fundamental threat to the american dream, our way of life and what we stand for around the globe. >> susan page is the washington bureau chief for usa today. clarence page, no relation, pulitzer prize-winning columnist and it's the first time we've had the pages squared on my show. >> it's great to have both of you. the president ticked off the statistics to how a growing number of americans face the reality of lower, real wages and higher costs. the prospect of a next generation with fewer opportunities for economic advancements that all to me sounds like, susan, a lot of the rhetoric from his 2008 campaign. why this push now and why the prospects of change now? >> i think it dates back to the 2008 presidential campaign and these their is wha
that is done here. and all the non-profits that call the arc home offer access to everything from education to health care to the safe shelter from the streets. which means you're harnessing the power of community. to expand opportunity for folks here in d.c. and your reflects the tradition that run through our history. the blood vessel we're greater together than on our own. over the last two months washington has been dominated by some contentious debates. i think it's fair to say. and between a reckless shut down by congressional republicans in an effort to repeal the affordable care act, and admitly poor execution on my administration's part on implementing the latest stage of the new law. it's not surprising the frustrations with the are at the all-time high. we know the frustrations run deeper than the most recent political battles. their frustration is rooted in their own daily battles fop make ends meet, to pay for college, buy a home, save for retirement. it's rooted in the nagging sense that no matter how hay work, the deck stacked against them. it's rooted in the fear they kids w
together, he a democrat, i, a republican. each other and share ideas on tax reform, on education reform. on getting things done. we love the environment on you can actually achieve results. that's the great thing of being a governor. i look at so many of the members of the utah state legislature who are here. and with each one of them, i can tell you stories about how we things done and the can-do attitude. it was remarkable. senate went on to the and became terribly frustrated with the culture that existed on that l hill, something evan knows a lot about. ournt on to china to become senior diplomat running the embassy there. nd we kind of regrouped a little bit later when joe and nancy jacobson, who was the power behind no labels initially came and said would you like to ecome part of the no labels movement. what on earth is no labels? is it a third party effort to ind of ship wreck the republicans and the democrats. is it a bunch of mushy moderates to get together to take over the world? none of the above. ome to find that it is a group that respects the fact that we system.two-party
, south korea, japan and hong kong for its education secretary arne duncan says the solution should include higher academic standards, affordable college and retention of top-notch educators. >>mark: today, president obama will start a new push for the health-care.gov website. in an event at the white house he will highlight people he says have been held by his health or care reform law and website. the president also working on possible subsidies to insurance companies to let people keep their existing insurance plans as was originally promised. the government say most of the glitches on these website have now been fixed. and now that to the website is supposed to be running smoother, consumers are reporting mixed success as they try and lock on to the updated health care exchange. >>james: and man was killed in a shark attack while fishing from a kayak in hawaii. it happened but it off the island of maui. apparently, the fishermen speak for dangling over the edge of his kayak when a shark bit one of them. a friend kayaking near by tried to stop the man's bleeding with a tourniquet
. >> ...thought provoking >> get your damn education. >> ...surprising >> oh, absolutely! >> ...exclusive one-on-one interviews with the most interesting people of our time. >> you're listening because you want to see what's going to happen. >> i want to know what works what do you know works? >> conversations you won't find anywhere else. >> talk to al jazeera. >> only on al jazeera america. >> oh my! >>> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm stephanie sy here are today's headlines. the u.s. economy is growing, but so is the income gap between the rich and the poor. president obama will talk about how to change that and other aspects of the economy when he speaks at a washington think tank in just a few minutes. vice president joe biden is meeting with chinese leaders in beijing but they didn't make any public comments over a dispute over a small group of islands in the east chai sea. >>> a senior leader of hezbollah is gunned down outside of his home in beirut. and they a blaming israel. israel is denying the accusations. >>> cigna announced it will no longer hire people who test positive
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